Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Happy Mail and Its Purpose

Someone told me recently that my sole reason
for sending reams of Happy Mail over the years
was because I wanted to receive comments about how kind I am.
That, apparently, I "only do things that give gratification."
Wow, don't hold back, why don't you tell me what you really think?
(I'm putting their comments down to a bad day.  We all have them.)
My reasoning for sending reams of Happy Mail is because it's fun.
It doesn't need a purpose.
I don't feel holier than thou when I drop mail into the postbox.
People like to receive unexpected cards and letters.
(My best friend's MiL writes around a dozen letters a week.
Mum was a prolific writer of letters).
I had a large collection of stationery - postcards, notebooks and the like -
that would never have been put to good use otherwise.

So, what's my point?
I wrote a few personal notes yesterday; a thank-you note
 and a hi-how-are-you kind of note,
and got to thinking about how some of those early recipients of Happy Mail  
have become friends, both via social media and in real life.
And I don't have a problem with that at all.
You could say I'm gratified
Isn't today's Happy Mail, in all its forms, merely a 21st Century version
of the old Pen Pal Clubs?
    

6 comments:

Ali said...

What you do is lovely and cheers someones day. I cant believe some people can say such horrible things - have they not heard that if you have nothing nice to say - dont say anything at all. xx

Jane said...

sounds a lovely idea, keep on doing it x

Patio Postcards said...

Oh my that was a horrible thing for that person to say, they must really be hurting to lash out. Relationships are often like a mine field & I am constantly baffled by what sets people off. I admire your BFF's MiL - dozens of letters a week - now that woman is a shining example.

Julie Kirk said...

Like the previous comment says - your critic must have some issues to lash out like that ... sounds like they were looking for a stick to beat you with and grabbed the first thing to hand. And they seem to be missing a point too ... because in some ways isn't gratification the reason we do a lot of things? Even when those things are good for others (especially if they are) we get to feel a little bit good about ourselves. And so what? There's nothing wrong with that. If we didn't know/like what it feels like to do nice things ... we'd probably do fewer of them.

You're having a rough old time lately ...

alexa said...

I am a great fan of Happy Mail and think It's A Jolly Nice Thing To Do and Receive, precisely because we don't expect anything back. My DD, who is now in her third decade, is still handwriting to friends as well as the Facebooking and texting - you just keep on inspiring the next generation and never mind the mealy-mouthed nay-sayers :).

debs14 said...

What a mean thing to say, and what rubbish. There's no excuse for people taking their bad moods out on others. Ignore their comments! There's nothing more likely to bring a smile to your face than some unexpected happy post arriving on your doorstep. It's comforting to know someone is thinking of you when you're going through a tough time, or just the fact that someone has taken the time out of a busy day to sit down and write a note to say hello.

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